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This is an at a glance free view guide to the Main Residence Nil Rate Band. Subscribers see Main Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB).

The main residence nil-rate band (RNRB) was introduced from 6 April 2017.

At a glance

What is the main residence nil rate band?

The RNRB is designed to counter the fact that the nil-rate band (currently £325,000 per individual) has not increased in line with property prices over the years.

How much is the RNRB and who can use it?

  £
2017/18 100,000
2018/19 125,000
2019/20 150,000
2020/21 175,000

 

What is the Transferable RNRB?

Married couples and civil partners can transfer any unused RNRB in the same way as they can transfer the normal nil rate band.

What if my property is worth less than the RNRB?

The RNRB cannot exceed the value of the property in the estate; see Main Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB) for how to calculate the amount of RNRB available.

What if the property is left partly to direct descendants and partly to other family members?

The RNRB is restricted in cases where the property is only partly left to direct descendants.

See Main Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB) for examples of how the rules work in these circumstances.

Who else can use the RNRB?

What if I have downsized my house?

If you sold your home on or after 8 July 2015, but you leave assets of an equivalent value to your children or other direct descendants when you die you may still be able to benefit from the RNRB.

 Planning points

Links to our useful guides:

Main Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB)
What is the Main Residence Nil Rate band? When was it introduced? How does it work? Who can claim it?

IHT: transferable nil rate band
What is the transferable nil rate band? Who does it apply to? How do I claim it?

Giving your home to your children
What are the tax issues in making a gift of your home to your children?

IHT: estate planning checklist
This basic checklist covers some of the essential planning points that taxpayers should know when planning for their estate and inheritance tax.